Citation:Bernhard,A.(2010)The Nitrogen Cycle: Processes, Players, and Human Impact.positiveeast.org Education Knowledge3(10):25
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Nitrogen is one of the primary nutrients critical for the survival of all living organisms. Although nitrogen is very abundant in the atmosphere, it is largely inaccessible in this form to most organisms. This article explores how nitrogen becomes available to organisms and what changes in nitrogen levels as a result of human activity means to local and global ecosystems.

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Nitrogen is one of the primary nutrients critical for the survival of all living organisms. It is a necessary component of many biomolecules, including proteins, DNA, and chlorophyll. Although nitrogen is very abundant in the atmosphere as dinitrogen gas (N2), it is largely inaccessible in this form to most organisms, making nitrogen a scarce resource and often limiting primary productivity in many ecosystems. Only when nitrogen is converted from dinitrogen gas into ammonia (NH3) does it become available to primary producers, such as plants.

In addition to N2 and NH3, nitrogen exists in many different forms, including both inorganic (e.g., ammonia, nitrate) and organic (e.g., amino and nucleic acids) forms. Thus, nitrogen undergoes many different transformations in the ecosystem, changing from one form to another as organisms use it for growth and, in some cases, energy. The major transformations of nitrogen are nitrogen fixation, nitrification, denitrification, anammox, and ammonification (Figure 1). The transformation of nitrogen into its many oxidation states is key to productivity in the biosphere and is highly dependent on the activities of a diverse assemblage of microorganisms, such as bacteria, archaea, and fungi.

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Since the mid-1900s, humans have been exerting an ever-increasing impact on the global nitrogen cycle. Human activities, such as making fertilizers and burning fossil fuels, have significantly altered the amount of fixed nitrogen in the Earth"s ecosystems. In fact, some predict that by 2030, the amount of nitrogen fixed by human activities will exceed that fixed by microbial processes (Vitousek 1997). Increases in available nitrogen can alter ecosystems by increasing primary productivity and impacting carbon storage (Galloway et al. 1994). Because of the importance of nitrogen in all ecosystems and the significant impact from human activities, nitrogen and its transformations have received a great deal of attention from ecologists.


Nitrogen gas (N2) makes up nearly 80% of the Earth"s atmosphere, yet nitrogen is often the nutrient that limits primary production in many ecosystems. Why is this so? Because plants and animals are not able to use nitrogen gas in that form. For nitrogen to be available to make proteins, DNA, and other biologically important compounds, it must first be converted into a different chemical form. The process of converting N2 into biologically available nitrogen is called nitrogen fixation. N2 gas is a very stable compound due to the strength of the triple bond between the nitrogen atoms, and it requires a large amount of energy to break this bond. The whole process requires eight electrons and at least sixteen ATP molecules (Figure 2). As a result, only a select group of prokaryotes are able to carry out this energetically demanding process. Although most nitrogen fixation is carried out by prokaryotes, some nitrogen can be fixed abiotically by lightning or certain industrial processes, including the combustion of fossil fuels.